Worcester Renewables Ltd

t:01386-871490 e:info@WorcesterRenewables.com

Tag: Community Projects

Feed-in Tariff tables from 1st August 2012 (until 1st November 2012)

 

Band (kW) Prior to August 1st
(Single Installation)
Standard generation tariff
(p/kWh)
Multi-installation tariff
(p/kWh)
Lower tariff
(if energy efficiency requirement not met)
(p/kWh)
Period of Tariff
(Years)
•4kW (new build)
21.0
16.0
14.4
7.1
20
•4kW (retrofit)
21.0
16.0
14.4
7.1
20
>4-10kW
16.8
14.5
13.05
7.1
20
>10-50kW
15.2
13.5
12.15
7.1
20
>50-100kW
12.9
11.5
10.35
7.1
20
>100-150kW
12.9
11.5
10.35
7.1
20
>150-250kW
12.9
11.0
9.9
7.1
20
>250kW-5MW
8.9
7.1
N/A
N/A
20
stand-alone
8.9
7.1
N/A
N/A
20
Export
3.2
4.5
4.5
4.5
20

So what does this mean to business and commercial installations?

It depends upon who you do business with.

Worcester Renewables buys direct from the manufacturers, and with 4 – 6 week lead times between purchase and delivery our prices are already determined for post 1st August, and whether your purchase before or after 1st August you will still see an ROI, index linked of 10% year on year.  However if you can install before the  1st August you will benefit from those payments for 25 years, as opposed to a reduced 20 years.

We also have funding available for a number of sites, so if you believe that you have a property that may be suitable for the installation of Solar PV, then just fill in the form below and we’ll get straight back to you:

 

[si-contact-form form=’7′]

DECC confirms FIT (Feed-in Tariff) changes to be 1st August

At the Ministerial announcement in the House of Commons today, Greg Barker laid out plans for the changes to the Feed-in Tariff to apply from the 1st August 2012

Changes to solar Feed-in Tariffs

Tariffs for solar pv installations to be reduced from 1 August:

  • 16p/kWh for household scale solar pv installations to reflect fall in cost of the technology, delivering a return of about 6% for a typical installation.
  • Tariffs for larger installations also to be reduced to reflect cost reductions but with most tariff cuts lower than proposed in February.
  • Reductions to apply to new installations from 1 August, instead of 1 July as proposed, in recognition of low uptake from 1 April and providing time for industry to adapt.

Multi installation tariff increased to 90% of standard tariff

  • Organisations with more than 25 solar pv installations will get 90% of the standard applicable tariff, increased from 80%, reflecting new evidence on costs involved for these projects.

Reduction in tariffs over time in line with uptake of FITs scheme

  • Ensuring solar PV is not over subsidised.
  • Average tariff reductions of 3.5% every 3 months, reductions will be bigger (up to 28%) if there is rapid uptake.
  • Tariff cuts will be skipped (for up to 2 quarters) if uptake is low.
  • Uptake in 3 different bands (domestic (size 0-10kW), small commercial (10-50kW) and large commercial (above 50kW and standalone installations) will determine the quarterly reductions within those bands.

Increase export tariff from 3.2p to 4.5p/kWh

  • To better reflect the real value of electricity exported to the grid.

RPI index-linking of generation tariffs to be retained

  • Reflecting the high value investors place on this element of the FITs scheme.

Scheme lifetime reduced from 25 to 20 years for new solar installations

  • Reducing the lifetime costs of the scheme and bring solar in line with most other technologies supported under FITs.

Tariffs for installations which do not meet the energy efficiency requirements will mirror the tariffs for standalone installations

  • Ensuring energy efficiency is still encouraged as tariffs are reduced.

Barclays launches £100m renewables fund for farmers

Bank’s business arm to help UK farmers finance renewable energy projects following a massive surge in interest

The use of renewable energy on farmland has been brought to public attention in Britain by Michael Eavis, farmer and founder of the Glastonbury music festival, who installed more than 1,000 solar panels on his land

Now, more than one-third of UK farmers want to install renewable energy projects on their land, most of them within the next year, and hope to generate average returns of £25,000 pounds a year, Barclays bank says.

The bank’s business arm on Tuesday launched a £100m fund to help farmers finance renewable energy projects, including solar panels, windfarms, hydro plants and organic waste power, as a growing number of agricultural businesses seek to benefit from government support tariffs.

"We want to signal very clearly to the market that we consider this to be a big future industry, a big opportunity for agricultural businesses and also a big opportunity for the renewables," said Barclays business product and marketing director, Travers Clarke-Walker, whose team will be managing the fund.

"This is a quickly emerging industry."

A Barclays survey of 300 agricultural customers also showed four out of five farmers recognise renewable energy can save costs and 60% see it as a source of additional income.

The use of renewable energy on farmland has been brought to public attention in Britain by Michael Eavis, farmer and founder of the Glastonbury music festival, who installed more than 1,000 solar panels on his land.

The cost of installing renewable energy projects can be recovered after around 10 years, Clarke-Walker said.

The UK government slashed state support for large-scale solar plants earlier this month as it was concerned a few huge commercial projects would scoop up money intended for household and community projects.

Nevertheless, Clarke-Walker expects around 80-90% of projects will be solar and windfarms as they are cheapest to build and their costs are forecast to drop by up to 50% in the next three to five years as demand rises and technology improves.

Britain aims to generate 15% of energy from renewable sources by 2020, compared with 7.4% reached in 2010.

The fund’s loan budget is unlimited and the first £100m could support more than 100 projects as the average cost varies between £250,000-£700,000, Clarke-Walker said.

Suffolk-based farmer Mike Porter, who plants crops such as wheat and oil seed rape, received a £130,000 loan from Barclays to install solar panels on a grain store last month and is expected to make £20,000 per year by exporting power to the National Grid.

Se the original article here: Guardian News